WHAT LURKS BENEATH

As the tide went out on the beach in Nusa Dua, it provided access to the life below. Our first sight was this urchin.

Urchins are usually nasty black things and very painful. We easily steered clear of many in the shallow water, but through the seaweed I saw this fellow. I have never seen anything like it and if colour indicated a warning, this must be a very dangerous urchin.

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Never seen anything like it. Having a 70-200m lens on meant that I didn’t have to get too close.

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One more shot, distorted by the sun cutting the water. As I got closer with the lens it moved to protect the center.

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I have no idea what this is .. but it looks like a cucumber or perhaps some sort of worm.

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This millipede was BIG (and fast). He disappeared in seconds.

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A lot of legs …

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He/she/it was right beside the crabs. Spot the 3 crabs.

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Finishing off with a few beautiful color shots, peaking out from under the water.

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Amazing natural colors of this anemone, an inch under the water.

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It was really hard to get shots of these corals as they were in shallow water and it kept ebbing and flowing.

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A moment later I caught the water coming in.

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How can I not finish with a starfish.

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It was fun to explore the shore.

3 SHOTS OF A BALINESE FISHERMAN

We stayed at the Westin in Nusa Dua in Bali and you look out on quite a nice ocean view.

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While eating lunch I saw this fellow wading out into the surf. I happened to have my 70-200mm lens on the 5D so I took a walk to down to observe. 3 shots …

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Love the hat.

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At the beach the tide slow recedes through the day revealing that which you were swimming over.

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You can walk for 100’s of meters to the edge and the reef. It was fun to see what lurked below … and surprising. (Next post).

OBSERVED AROUND TOKYO

Mark your calendar. I am saving up for this day (actually, from Bali)

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In Hong Kong they build buildings with bamboo scaffolds. In Canada, you climb up the sides of a scaffold. In Japan .. it as one would expect.

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Amazing how this product looks suspiciously similar to the Dyson innovation. By Toto Japan. Mitsubishi has one too.

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As seen in a Japanese parking lot. I have been warned, in a rather contradictory manner.

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ONE MORE BALI TEMPLE

In the middle of the country, in a little town with a name I did not know. Just another town along the road and another breathtaking temple, built by locals over hundreds of years. Famous? No. Breathtaking? Yes.

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A lot of the gates had lions. I wonder why?

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The owner of this scooter was no where to be seen. Because it was about to rain again … hard.

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This shot gives you a sense of this rural Balinese village temple. It is huge and multi-sectioned .. and yes, about to rain.

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Deity carvings were everywhere.

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And many of the carvings were decorated.

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The intricacies of this door are remarkable.

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It was the entrance on this kori agung gate (roofed) with a candi bentar gate beside it (right).

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And the detail across the temple caught the eye at every turn.

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They had not gotten out all of the decorations yet, but were starting.

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Truly amazing. So much care and beauty .. in a remote location. One of a thousand temples, that will never be famous.

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Glad we stopped. And thanks for stopping by.

TO VISIT A BALI TEMPLE

As mentioned, Bali is filled with temples. It is a Hindu province in a predominantly Muslim Indonesia. The notion of the Balinese temple is very different than the traditional Christian North American or European geography, where there is a church in a small village. In Bali, temples are every few meters.

There are large temples, small temples, village temples, temples near bridges, temples in the middle of the jungle, temples in homes. They are everywhere. We had selected Gunung Kawi as the temple we would visit.

It was getting later in the day and as we approached it started to rain. Hope was high that it would pass. Our driver explained what to do; you must acquire a sarong which can be rented at the temple for a dollar or buy one. We made our way to the entrance and were accosted by some very motivated sellers. $15 later we had 4 very nice sarongs. There are very strict on this cultural tradition. Configuration: Canon 5D Mark III and 28-70mm f/2.8.

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Alas, the weather was not cooperating. It rained harder.

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We made our way down to the temple (275 steps) … and then after a wait, headed back. It was not lifting. We were at the end of the day and began our trek home. After 30 minutes the rain lifted and we stopped as a “temple” was on the to-do list. This time the bathing temple, 9th century Goa Gajah:

At the façade of the cave is a relief of various menacing creatures and demons carved right into the rock at the cave entrance. The primary figure was once thought to be an elephant, hence the nickname Elephant Cave. The site is mentioned in the Javanese poem Desawarnana written in 1365. An extensive bathing place on the site was not excavated until the 1950s.[2] These appear to have been built to ward off evil spirits.

The weather cooperated.

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As a Canadian I always marvel at the age of things. This temple is very old.

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A step down to the water.

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The mouth to the elephant cave, a sanctuary.

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We did not linger. The storm had caught up …….

BESIDE A BALI ROAD

As I mentioned in a previous post, driving in Bali is different than in South American countries. In Bali every meter has some form of life jammed into it. I don’t know how to describe the press of humanity, at every corner and every meter. We just stared out the window and watched as scene after scene passed by. A few observations ….

You would see bottles of Vodka or other large glass alcohol containers at the front of many stores. It is not Vodka, it is petrol. I saw very few gas stations except in the more modern towns. Correction, these are the gas stations.

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As in most 3rd world countries, their use of the scooter was impressive.

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And helmets were discretionary, as were the number of passengers.

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Surprised to see a little bit of Canada, on a remote road. Life insurance anyone?

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The shops are visually fascinating with ornate carvings, huge pieces of wood for tables and the most amazing doors.

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We were feeling extra safe at our hotel (Westin Nusa Dua) as there was a big conference going on. There were military and police everywhere.

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I understand that a few different Presidents were in town, with impressive motorcades.

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One morning we took a walk outside of the tourist campus (As you can see above, very clean and well manicured). The economic collapse has hit Bali also.

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I stopped at this abandoned shopping complex to take a few shots.

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Things are tough all over.

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