PIT 2, UNDER EXCAVATION

Pit 2, located 20 meters north of Pit 1 is very different. Smaller (but still 6,000 meters square), and shaped in an “L” it contains mixed military forces of archers, charioteers, cavalry and infantry. At present, a large portion remains unexcavated.

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I would think that when deciding if you wish to be an archaeologist, the first question you should ask yourself is “Do I like jigsaw puzzles?”

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Well preserved charioteers.

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TERRACOTTA ARMY, PIT 1

A few more shots from Pit 1. The front of the pit is all assembled in neat rows.

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The back is still under excavation with the soldiers being excavated and assembled.

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Saran wrap, not just for keeping your produce fresh.

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If you look closely, you can see remnants of the original paint.

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An army partly assembled. Note how each horse is different.

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A chariot partially recovered.

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One last shot from Pit 1, to give you a sense of scale.

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They still have lots to uncover.

TERRACOTTA ARMY, XI’AN

The Terracotta Army went on my personal bucket list many years go while living in England, at the O2 for one reason – seeing 30 warriors at the British Museum did not cut it.

The army is estimated to have taken 36 years to complete and 700,000 workers. At the time I did not know where Xi’an was in China,  I certainly did not think that we would be living in Tokyo (although Singapore was always heavily under family consideration), but I knew it had to happen.

It was worth the wait and the effort. Broken into a series of “pits”, with several still being excavated, the scale of the place is staggering.

Thousands of warriors, each different standing in rows, their weapon disintegrated but their bodies remaining. Amazing.

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On many you can still see the paint remnants.

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Rows, and rows and rows.

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The chariots.

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Oddly enough, this is the only warrior I saw that looked out of proportion. A charioteer.

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700,000 people and 36 years. It boggles the mind.

THE GREAT WALL

There are two ways to do the great wall. Hitting the tourist areas which are cleared out, easy access and involves a cable ride up and taking a ride down to the bottom via a toboggan  OR hitting an abandoned area with a guide.

We chose the abandoned hike route.

The hike was 7-8km long and not the easiest. A fit family, but when it is 35C (+humidity), not a cloud in the sky and the first 1.5km involves an elevation change of 800 meters, your fitness is tested (Actually, the other 3 did fine, the only one tested was me). Fortunately, our guide provided the right amount of instruction on quantity of water and ensured that we brought enough food.

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I will say that about half way up with a backpack full of bottled water, my Canon 5D Mark III, the 28-300mm f/2.8 lens and a 50mm lens stored in my pack (Why a 50mm? No idea), I was wondering if I should have packed a bit lighter.

Our starting point was at what use to be a resort hotel of some type – no longer.

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The chicken coop at the start of the hike.

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The trail up is a mix of steps (In a few of the steepest places) and rough hiking trails – at a 45 degree or steeper angle. The math makes sense, 1.5km, 800m elevation. Clearly not over-used. In our 7-8 hour hike, we saw 2 other people who were on a hike with their dogs.

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As we stopped, we took the time to look back over the valley. Beautiful views and a clear day. A stark contrast to the polluted Beijing sky.

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It is a long way up but very satisfying when we came around a corner and the wall came into sight.

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Our destination where we will break out lunch.

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A good start.

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THE NINE DRAGON WALL

In the Forbidden City, Beijing, China.

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A little bit on the history of the wall:

is a type of screen wall with reliefs of nine different Chinese dragons. Such walls are typically found in imperial Chinese palaces and gardens.

Early reference to the tradition of putting a screen wall at the gate is found in the Analects, 3:22: therein, it is mentioned as a trivial ritual norm ("The princes of States have a screen intercepting the view at their gates". 邦君樹塞門, trans. by James Legge).

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Built in 1771. It is beautiful to look at.

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