GUITAR HERO MYSTIFIES

 

I found it interesting to read the two viewpoints on the game Guitar Hero (and others like it) in this article (Via):

Real musicians:

"I’ve been puzzled by the popularity of the game Guitar Hero," writes Rob Horning at PopMatters. "If you want a more interactive way to enjoy music, why not dance, or play air guitar? Or better yet, if holding a guitar appeals to you, why not try actually learning how to play? For the cost of an Xbox and the Guitar Hero game, you can get yourself a pretty good guitar."

There seems to be a consensus that real musicians look down on games like this. I can understand their point of view. After all, to become a musician is a lot of hard work.

While the comments about the article provide a different viewpoint:

Sean has it right. All the silly crying about guitar hero is about as absurd as it gets.

All sorts of people who would have never thought they would be able to play guitar are trying it out because guitar hero was fun, and showed them that ‘hey, maybe I could play guitar a little bit.’

And further, it’s exposing people to a lot of music they never would have otherwise sought out. You’d think people who really loved music would think these to be good things. But instead the reaction has been largely one of snobbery, like this blog post.

I found this statement particularly interesting:

The moment you will find me grinning: When ten years from now, one or more newly famous rockers credit their music career to Guitar Hero getting them interested in music. Only then will all this ridiculous hand wringing be put in its proper context.

Interesting to see a debate rage. Personally, I find the game a ton of fun to play with the family. But I hold no illusion that I am a musician (I was a good Sax player at one point, but that was long ago) nor do I want to become one. We will see if it impacts my boys, there is talk of guitar lessons.

In the meantime, EA’s sales of Guitar Hero III becomes the first game to cross $1 billion. Amazing.

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